Talk about a month. November is usually a month we have too much going on to keep up with everything. The children are excited for the U.S. Thanksgiving holiday and know that their winter celebrations are just around the corner, and often we’re hosting a book fair. This November my classes had an additional emotional distraction from their learning plans. Two children lost their father very suddenly to a newly discovered cancer in our school; their mother teaches here, too. I cannot imagine the loss. Three classrooms in our small school were affected, as were all who knew this family.

Supporting our little ones is always the goal, and this November didn’t change that. We found places to play, had discussions and supported their mother’s wish that they don’t remember this as the November everything changed. This would be the November they lost their father, but they were loved and supported.

As librarian my first work was to ensure they had emotional resources. In early childhood education that means not only books, but gave information for local specialists, councilors and play centers where grieving children can play and cry as they need to do. Of course we found books. My favorite, Death is Stupid,  supports the griever and tells that it’s OK to feel what your feeling. As some caring, but unthinking support members said things like, “You don’t have anything to be thankful for this Thanksgiving since your Dad died,” and “Guess you should learn to carve the turkey,” this book told them that it’s OK to play when they feel like it and to remember their dad by wearing his clothes and doing the things he loved. It’s OK to grieve for a pet, a parent, a grandparent. It’s OK to not be OK sometimes.

The second book, Rabbityness, talks about all the things a specific rabbit did that were different from the others, and what an emptiness was left when it wasn’t there any longer. When the rabbits felt they could start trying to do those things, too. The missing rabbit used to paint and make music. The rabbits remembered it while they learned to sing and make music. With practice they became very good at music and art and still remembered the missing rabbit with their lives.

I’m crying writing this post. I’ve been off the internet for quite some time because this was not my only loss this month. Helping this family with their experiences has helped me as well. I hope that no one has to feel this, but so long as we’re working together, we have something very special to look forward to: each other.

 

As you know, I work in education. My hobby, writing, is something I hope to grow into over time. I call it a hobby because the time and money I put into writing at this point moves around my day job and does not break even in book sales. So what’s an early childhood educator to do? Well, I’m going to do a better job keeping up my blog and add affiliate links to see if I can help suppliment this educator’s income.

I almost never talk about what I’m reading and writing directly. I allude to it, but I will start not only talking about the resources I’m using, but I’ll be linking to them. I realized that I support some of my favorite artists on Patreon and when I went looking for some formatting software I stopped in at my favorite writing podcast and used her affiliate links to help her out. I want these artists and information spreader’s to keep going, so I want to support them in the small ways that I can.

I hope you understand. I want you to trust what I say, and when I recommend something that means I use it and like it. I’m not trying to pull one over on you, but to add a few passive-income pennies to the pot to support my family and the purchases I make to write curriculum and share.

As you know, I work in education. My hobby, writing, is something I hope to grow into over time. I call it a hobby because the time and money I put into writing at this point moves around my day job and does not break even in book sales. What’s an early childhood educator to do? I’m going to do a better job keeping up my blog and add affiliate links to see if I can help supplement this educator’s income. I almost never talked about what I was reading and writing directly. I allude to it, but I will start not only talking about the resources I’m using, but I’ll be linking to them. I realized that I support some of my favorite artists on Patreon and when I went looking for some formatting software I stopped in at my favorite writing podcast and used her affiliate links to help her out. I want these artists and information spreader’s to keep going, so I want to support them in the small ways that I can.

I hope you understand that I’m not out to make a fortune through these links. When I recommend something that means I use it and like it. I’m not trying to pull one over on you, but to add a few passive-income pennies to the pot to support my family and the purchases I make to write curriculum and share.